As A Moderate, Character Matters More

As the dust begins to settle on the political landscape throughout the country, the most logical question for me is, “Now what?”  Here in Ohio, many Democrats lost their seat, including the position of governor.  Nation-wide, Republicans now have control of the House with their sites set on another house…the White House.  But for now, will things really change like every politician promises?  I suppose things will change at some level, but I seriously doubt anything significant will occur.

THE MORE THINGS CHANGE, THE MORE THEY STAY THE SAME

In Ohio’s governor race, Republican John Kasich ran his campaign on one single argument; that under opponent Ted Strickland’s term as governor the state lost more than 400,000 jobs.  Now I’m not giving Strickland a pass here; Kasich’s argument is certainly fair game.  But I wonder if at all it was possible to keep or gain jobs during a national recession?  Might it have been worse under the leadership of someone else?  Nobody can say.  Perhaps Kasich will remedy this problem, perhaps not.  My point is that both governors, although sitting on different sides of the aisle, could very likely have the same results in most of the key areas.  Ideologically, Republicans and Democrats may be miles apart; but practically, they are more the same.  Case and point is the fact that most election opponents accuse one another of the very same things:  pork-barrel spending, ruining the economy, losing a war, increasing debt, and so on and so on.  Republicans blame Democrats for the economic woes of the country, Democrats say they are only struggling to fix a giant mess caused previously by Republicans.  People throw darts at the “blame board” to see who the fault will land on, because actual blame is far too complex for any one candidate to figure out.   But throughout the barrage one thing is certain…politicians are a big part of the problem.

THE MIDDLE WAY

Being a moderate means that there are points from both sides that I agree with.  I can’t fully endorse the entire agenda of Democrats or Republicans, so I’m Independent.  Now I am much different from Independents who are conservative or liberal and claim Independent in order to pull their own party from the middle and closer to a polar end.  In the end, these Independents will rarely vote for anything other than the party they’re trying to reform…no matter the candidate.  A moderate Independent has a much more difficult task of discerning who to vote for.  At first it seems easy, because a moderate knows that there’s going to be a couple things that they agree with any candidate about, creating less urgency.  It’s also likely that change is not as imminent as a candidate suggests, leaving room for a moderate to consider a very important and needed element: character.  Issues don’t take a back seat, but judging character plays a heavier role in the moderate vote.  Those further from the middle on each side of the spectrum will likely vote less according to the actual candidate and more according to the side or party that they are on.  Candidates know all of this, which is why they often resolve to slinging mud at their opponents and getting personal (b.t.w…this has an opposite effect with me).  This is what makes voting hard to for the moderate, because we ultimately can’t get to know any candidate on a personal level and make an informed judgment.

HOW ABOUT YOU?

Unfortunately, I can’t offer any solutions at this point.  This blog entry was meant to be more descriptive than prescriptive.  If anyone has any suggestions on how they can best determine a candidate’s character and leadership capabilities, comment and let me know.  Until then, keep searching your heart on the issues.  And even though it’s difficult at times, get your vote in.

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “As A Moderate, Character Matters More

  1. Eric,

    I agree with you on some points and disagree on others. And just wanted to say a couple points. I dont believe candidates stand for anything except themselves. They will swap to influences of money or power (ie: Arlen Spector. He thought the power was with Obama and the Democrats and it was for a short period.)
    I vote for the party not the candidate. Majority democrats believe in unions, abortion, bigger government and higher taxes. I cannot support any of these. I believe you and I agree on the issue of abortion, unions at one time had their place but now the are destroying America by protecting the lazy and corrupt. We can not compete in the world and will continue to lose jobs as long as unions have the influence they do in our government. Bigger government? well lets just say that Medicare, Social Security, and US postal service are bankrupt or close to, and now they want to manage Healthcare? Businesses are not hiring because they are afraid of the costs this will have on them, the uncertainty is why there is no confidence in the economy. Higher taxes, again the threat that Obama and congress are going to let the Bush tax cuts expire and causing the single biggest tax hike in history, (especially after Obama promised we would not see any higher taxes).And everyone knows that all of these bailouts, additional social programs and the recent printing 600 billion dollars to buy our own debt have to be paid somehow. Taxes are the only way because it doesnt look like they are cutting anything else.
    Republicans, are just as corrupt dont get me wrong, but I believe with this last election are going into power with a little more respect for the people that elect them, they know now that if they are not doing the job of the people they will be voted out. I voted Republican, because I felt they would slow down Obama’s agenda and with the US people knowing that they will try and extend the tax cuts, reform the healthcare bill if not repeal it. And attempt to stop the excessive spending, confidence in the economy will come back and companies will start hiring again. Government does not create jobs ,Private companies and people create jobs.

    Just a side note guess who signed the low income housing bill that created the housing and financial bubble… Bill Clinton 1999, Democrat. I do blame George Bush for not seeing it and letting it continue for as long as it did.

    Thanks

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s