How Does an Atheist Search for God?

Is it possible to search for God without first having an expected answer in mind?

Perhaps it’s simply how our minds work –we first have a hypothesis and then must test to see if it’s true.  Through that testing we may not have a definitive answer but we have discovered something.

Whether a person of faith, atheist, or agnostic…is it even possible to continue to search for God in true objectivity?  The atheists and agnostics will both claim that believers are the ones with a bias, and they are true third-party observers…but that’s not really the case.

Atheists have already decided that God doesn’t exist, making their search for answers more of a “prove me wrong” type of perspective.

Agnostics have already decided that the existence of God is unknowable, and so their bias would naturally prevent them from knowing God if God could be known.

And people of faith…well…you get the idea.

There is no truly unbiased approach in this sojourn for answers.  Searching for God has to begin with even the slightest notion that God is there and able to be found; otherwise why would you embark on a quest to find nothing?

So, my atheist friend, would you dare to consider God’s existence in order to truly find out?

 

 

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6 thoughts on “How Does an Atheist Search for God?

  1. “Atheists have already decided that God doesn’t exist, making their search for answers more of a “prove me wrong” type of perspective.”

    Incorrect.

    As an atheist myself, I can tell you I did not decide that a god doesn’t exist. I gave it lots of thought and only concluded, after the finding the utter lack of good or convincing evidence, that a god most likely doesn’t exist.

    ‘”So, my atheist friend, would you dare to consider God’s existence in order to truly find out?”

    I have. Multiple times. And have yet to receive any good evidence.

    1. The subject of the existence of God is a non-science. Meaning, you cannot determine the existence of God through a series of testing, which is the scientific process. Irregardless, your comment suggests that you began with the premise that there is nothing, looking for proof that there is something. That happens to be good science, but it also conditions the lens through which you search for God. And since you cannot “test” the existence of God, you’re simply left with your premise. The same bias exists with believers, by the way. My post simply was making the point that neither position is truly objective. Aside from all that, I appreciate your comment and the fact that you gave the search for God an effort. Cheers.

      1. “Irregardless, your comment suggests that you began with the premise that there is nothing,”

        No. I began with claims made by religious people and religions. I then looked for evidence for those claims. And I found nothing compelling.

      2. Fair enough. Again I appreciate your search, and would love to hear more about your story. What specifically did you look into, and what were your main points of difficulty?

  2. “What specifically did you look into”

    Any and all supernatural claims as presented to me by acquaintances, strangers and holy books. My main point of difficulty was the utter lack of non-anecdotal evidence for those claims.

    “Also, what evidence were you looking for? I’m honestly intrigued by that.”

    Any good, non anecdotal evidence would be great.

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