6 thoughts on “What I’m Reading

  1. I would suggest putting down that nonsense from Chomsky and that liberation theology (aka people with self-esteem issues) and reading Francis Fukuyama’s “Origins of Political Order” for a more level headed review of America’s role in the world 🙂

  2. Hemingway’s “For Whom the Bell Tolls” is a good read right after you finish “War and Peace.”

  3. I’ll take you up on that Brooks, but I wouldn’t throw aside Chomsky as “nonsense”, nor liberation theology. I know you disagree with Chomsky’s opinions of his documentation, but the documentation alone causes any person to think about the U.S.’s world conquests from an ethical point of view.

  4. Chomsky does raise important issues but he makes the same mistake of only pointing out minor wrongs and disregarding all the major good America has done. And his whole viewpoint on the ethics of dropping the atomic bomb on Japan calls his own moral and ethical judgment into question on nearly everything else. Liberation theology is all too often turned into a racial issue. People like you and I who want to bring people together should avoid that kind of thing no?

    1. I think what I appreciate about Chomsky is that anyone can be under critique according to ethical standards. So if terrorism is bad, then it should be bad no matter who does it. For example we may call Saddam a monster for mass-murdering Kurds, but we don’t hold ourselves accountable to state sponsored terrorism in Nicaragua. Now, you’ll say that those are measures of war/protection against “evil” Communism and therefore “good”…but they are PREVENTATIVE measures, not directly provoked measures. It’s at the very least a very good thing to question and debate if preventative measures are really defensive in nature, because most times we are the aggressors (or at least the supporters: i.e. we’re the largest arms dealer in the world). I think that when you look at things from a theological perspective, the ends CANNOT justify the means. That is why I highlighted MLK and Gandhi in our earlier debate, because though they may be dead (or unprotected), they were certainly good. There are a lot of great things about the US, but as a person of faith I’m not willing to defend American freedom and democracy by turning a blind eye to the atrocities that we sponsor/perform in order to “protect” that American freedom and democracy…not when I believe that true freedom comes in knowing Christ and being with God in eternity.

      Liberation Theology needs to be understood as “contextual theology.” That doesn’t make it only relative. We should listen to our third-world brothers and sisters and how they view God because we also contextualize our theology (i.e. prosperity gospel, among many others).

      I have not read any commentary of Chomsky on WWII, but I don’t think it’s unamerican to question the atom bombing in Japan. I have heard many make the point that we had already essentially defeated Japan and that the atom bomb was literally “overkill.” Was the US trying to make a point to the USSR? The basic question of whether we could have won the war against Japan without going nuclear is valid in my mind. I’m not saying it was justified or not…but it’s a valid thing to ask.

  5. I think what I appreciate about Chomsky is that anyone can be under critique according to ethical standards. So if terrorism is bad, then it should be bad no matter who does it. For example we may call Saddam a monster for mass-murdering Kurds, but we don’t hold ourselves accountable to state sponsored terrorism in Nicaragua. Now, you’ll say that those are measures of war/protection against “evil” Communism and therefore “good”…but they are PREVENTATIVE measures, not directly provoked measures. It’s at the very least a very good thing to question and debate if preventative measures are really defensive in nature, because most times we are the aggressors (or at least the supporters: i.e. we’re the largest arms dealer in the world). I think that when you look at things from a theological perspective, the ends CANNOT justify the means. That is why I highlighted MLK and Gandhi in our earlier debate, because though they may be dead (or unprotected), they were certainly good. There are a lot of great things about the US, but as a person of faith I’m not willing to defend American freedom and democracy by turning a blind eye to the atrocities that we sponsor/perform in order to “protect” that American freedom and democracy…not when I believe that true freedom comes in knowing Christ and being with God in eternity.
    +1

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